Tag Archives: alien invasive species

Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests: Tools For Success

By Ken Fry, PhD

Another set of tools for the landscape manager is the abundance of online and digital resources for pest identification. There are a growing number of integrated pest management (IPM) apps for digital devices, especially for turf management. However, there are not so many for accurate identification of tree pests. Instead, one has to rely on experts or limited knowledgebase apps. Landscape managers can now turn to social media and ‘citizen science’ sites on the web for support.

A useful site to solicit insect identification or to browse images to make identification is BugGuide.net. There are over 750,000 images of over 125,000 species available. Visitors can post an image and request identification from the hundreds of amateur and professional naturalists that frequent the site.

In an increasingly risk-prone landscape, managers should do what they can to exploit the functionality of the ecosystem to aid them in protecting the urban forest.
Steps that can be taken include:
• Providing a diverse habitat with adequate resources,
• Supporting beneficial arthropods by providing nectar and nesting resources; and
• Encouraging the development of a robust and vibrant landscape that is capable of resisting incursions by pests, native or alien.

Of course, early and accurate detection of pests is a must, and can be assisted by accessing the increasing array of online services and support.

Read the full article: Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests

Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests: What Can You Do?

By Ken Fry, PhD

The green industry is being encouraged to be vigilant in the effort to detect invasive species. Unusual or novel arthropods or tree symptoms should be reported to a local government pest monitoring agent or directly to the CFIA. With many eyes open to the threat of invasive species, early detection can mitigate the risk posed by these species.

In managing the landscape, an ecological approach should be taken so as to provide the necessary resources to support a functioning ecosystem. With adequate nutrition, water, suitable soil conditions, and a vibrant and biodiverse flora and fauna, the urban forest can defend against native and alien pests. Indeed, in designing or renovating a landscape, the manager should strive for spatial, bio and temporal diversity.

Read the full article: Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests

Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests: Alien Monitoring

By Ken Fry, PhD

Several agencies across Canada are actively monitoring for alien invasive species. One such program in Alberta is the Alien Invasive Species Surveillance program, conducted in collaboration with the CFIA, the Society to Prevent Dutch Elm Disease (SPDED), and Olds College.

The program uses sets of four Lindgren funnel traps which are placed at 15 locations in the province deemed to be a high risk for importation of arthropods (i.e. ports of entry, major trans-shipment terminals for containers, delivery points for heavy equipment). Each of the four traps has a separate pheromone or host odour lure targeting wood wasps (family Siricidae), bark beetles (sub-family Scolytinae), metallic wood-boring beetles (family Buprestidae), and long-horned beetles (family Cerambycidae). The traps are serviced bi-weekly and the catch processed to determine if any invasive species are present.

Read the full article: Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests

Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests: At Home In Canada

By Ken Fry, PhD

Canada’s trading partners have changed over time with Asia coming to dominate our imports. Many are likely familiar with the long list of pests that have originated in Europe, our largest offshore trading partner in previous decades. Now, we are faced with a new list of potential threats from these new trading regions.

An analysis of climate data comparing Alberta to the rest of the world indicates a large swath of Central and East Asia has a climate similar to that of Alberta, indicating arthropods from these regions have a high probability of surviving upon arrival in the province. The same can be said for large portions of Canada. Therefore, there is a real risk of alien invasive species becoming established here if introduced via importation of goods.

Read the full article: Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests

Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests

By Ken Fry, PhD

The urban forest is a highly disturbed, albeit managed, ecosystem. Quite often the trees in an urban forest are isolated, planted in sub-optimal conditions, or subject to minimal maintenance. These conditions are considered to be highly disturbed in ecological terms. Compounding the stresses arising from these conditions is the risk of introduction of alien invasive species as a result of trade occurring on a global scale.

With increasing international trade, especially with partners in Asia and south Asia, comes the risk of alien invasive species becoming established in our urban forests. ‘Alien’ refers to any organism that originates from another ecoregion, although it is more commonly associated with organisms that originate from another continent. The term, ‘invasive,’ denotes the potential to become established in its new home, to be able to repeatedly overwinter successfully outdoors. Therefore, an alien invasive species is one that is not native and becomes naturalized, a permanent fixture in the local ecosystem. Often, this results in the displacement of native species that compete for the same resources or, in a worst case scenario, the over-exploitation of the resources due to the absence of any effective natural enemies.

Read the full article: Protecting The Urban Forest: Aliens, Biological Control, And Pests