Tag Archives: polypropylene

The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines: Less Maintenance, More Money

Synthetic turf tee lines are a great option when the environment is particularly hostile to natural grass, for example arid and/or flooded environments where there is little to no natural light to promote healthy turf growth. Photo courtesy Synthetic Turf International of Canada

By Scott Smockum

Synthetic turf tee lines are a great option when the environment is particularly hostile to natural grass, for example arid and/or flooded environments where there is little to no natural light to promote healthy turf growth. Synthetic turf can withstand significantly more use than natural grass and, therefore, can be used much more frequently, allowing golf course owners to open earlier, or sometimes operate year-round, to generate more income from their facilities.

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The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines: The Next Step—Preparing the Base

Newer technologies in base construction allow courses to take advantage of the benefits of gravel and concrete subgrade installations via the use of engineered structural base panels. Photo courtesy Synthetic Turf International of Canada

By Scott Smockum

After selecting the type of yarn used to manufacture the synthetic turf, perhaps the most important decision is preparing the base. Generally, there are three options to consider: straight concrete or asphalt, crush and compacted gravel, or an engineered structural base system.

Concrete will provide the most firm and smooth base; however, its drawback is it can be very expensive. The initial install can be costly and, once installed, there is not much leeway when it comes to relocating or removing the tee line.

Gravel is by far the most common subgrade used for synthetic turf tee line installations. It is effective, cheap, and easy to install. However, it has recently been discovered, when using a synthetic turf tee line with a low face weight, the gravel will eventually migrate into a washboard effect. Over time, the impact of the club head creates a slight depression in the subgrade. The next range ball will roll to the low spot and the golfer hits from there. This cycle continues until the depression becomes evident enough to the golfer. The golfer will then move the ball roughly 101 mm (4 in.) behind or in front of the depression and the cycle continues.

Newer technologies in base construction allow courses to take advantage of the benefits of gravel and concrete subgrade installations by using engineered structural base panels.

Read the full article: The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines

The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines: The Pros and Cons of Each Yarn—Polyethylene

By Scott Smockum

Polyethylene is a very soft yarn and should be avoided for synthetic turf tee line applications. As the yarn is so soft, it will not only wear out quickly, but it will also leave markings on the club head. Further, the softness will allow the fibres to lie flat, which in turn could knot up, making it impossible to insert a tee.

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The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines: The Pros and Cons of Each Yarn—Polypropylene

By Scott Smockum

Polypropylene is the most common yarn used to manufacture synthetic turf found in driving range hitting mats. It is not only cost effective, but it can easily be considered a durable product. When thinking about a synthetic turf tee line dense enough to hold a tee, while keeping costs in mind, polypropylene is a great product. Although it does show signs of wear, the wear pattern in polypropylene is straight down. This allows users to stick a tee into the product throughout its life and will also stand tall enough to allow the club head to travel ‘down and through.’

Drawbacks in using the polypropylene would be the possibility of it leaving some green markings on the user’s clubs. Another disadvantage is increased colour loss. As the club head is chaffing the fibres with each impact, over time (three to five years, dependent on use) they will begin to fray and become lighter in appearance. In comparison, nylon does not wear down nearly as much and it can be said it has a much higher colour steadfast.

Read the full article: The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines

The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines: The Pros and Cons of Each Yarn—Nylon

By Scott Smockum

Nylon is the most durable product. However, it is the most expensive yarn. Another drawback to nylon is it will also be the first to settle down, making it difficult to stick in a natural tee. It can be said that nylon does not wear out, it just simply mats down. Unfortunately, this matting down effect can increase the chance of a club head catching a ‘knot,’ stopping the club and golfer immediately—something superintendents will want to avoid. As nylon does not wear out, it will not leave a green stain on the bottom of the user’s irons after hitting a bucket of balls. For users who have hit off of a driving mat or synthetic turf that left a green streak on the bottom of their clubs, there is a good chance it was not nylon.

Read the full article: The Benefits of Using Synthetic Turf Tee Lines